Iron Will by James Maxwell #GuestPost #BlogTour

War has come to Xanthos. Across the sea, the insane King Palemon’s lust for gold has driven him to build an army of dragons that will soon destroy everything in their path. Neighbouring royalty, Prince Dion and Princess Chloe, refuse to be helpless pawns in a clash of nations, and strive to bring their kingdoms together to fight this impending threat. When they find themselves hopelessly outmanned and outgunned, their only hope is to go in search of the secretive and powerful race of shapeshifters called the Eldren who have long since disappeared into the mysterious Wilds.

 All the while, an ancient, terrible power rises from the ashes to once again claim all-consuming power and domination over Xanthos. The world faces a war to end all wars, and enemies once fighting over gold must now become allies to face this rising evil, less everything they hold dear be destroyed and their whole world be plunged into darkness.

 As a world-spanning conflict begins, a king is betrayed, a prophecy is …

Book Review: A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers

Before reading this I checked out the reviews on Goodreads and it certainly seems to be a book that divides opinions. For every person who loved it there seems to be another who vehemently loathed it. After reading it I can say I'm mostly in the loved it camp - although that's not to say I loved everything about it, but more of that later.
It's a memoir borne of tragedy, Dave Eggers' parents both died of cancer 32 days apart, leaving Dave, his sister Beth and brothers Bill and Christopher (Toph). At just 21 Eggers became the primary carer for eight year old Toph and they leave the suburb of Chicago they grew up in to start a new life in California. This book loosely follows what happens next, how Eggers adjusts to his new father figure role whilst attempting to start up the magazine, Might with his friends. I say loosely because this isn't a straightforward telling, it meanders through narrative that is often a stream of consciousness and is neither fiction or non fiction but something in between. I do wonder if it's a book that needs to be read at the right time, I found the self-centred constant awareness of the jumble of thoughts and ideas was something I could identify with but I don't know if I would have felt the same way had I read it years ago. It was almost exhausting to read at times, there are parts that are gut wrenchingly beautiful, "I like the dark part of the night, after midnight and before four-thirty, when it's hollow, when ceilings are harder and farther away. Then I can breathe, and can think while others are sleeping, in a way can stop time, can have it so – this has always been my dream – so that while everyone else is frozen, I can work busily about them, doing whatever it is that needs to be done, like the elves who make the shoes while children sleep.” then later that ego that so polarises opinion, "We are the bright new stars born of a screaming black hole, the nascent suns burst from the darkness, from the grasping void of space that folds and swallows--a darkness that would devour anyone not as strong as we. We are oddities, sideshows, talk show subjects. We capture everyone's imagination.”
By the end of the book I was able to truly appreciate what Eggers has done here, it's often a frustrating read but nonetheless penetrated my thoughts in such a way that I couldn't put it down. I empathised with him, could understand the chaos raging within him but there is an underlying brittleness that just kept me from completely loving it. I really enjoyed it and will read more Eggers, I just need a little more warmth to totally fall for a book.